Women in Ministry and Reformed Hermeneutics
Thursday, June 9, 2011 at 8:01AM
Ben Simpson in Church Ministry, James K. A. Smith, Reformed Theology, Women in Ministry, undefined

In his book Letters to a Young Calvinist: An Invitation to the Reformed Tradition, James K. A. Smith strikes up an imaginary dialogue with someone who has recently adopted the Reformed outlook, providing wisdom, insight, and direction that he wishes he himself had during his college years, as he first entered the Reformed tradition.  In a postscript to one of the letters, Smith touches on the topic of women in ministry.  Most Reformed leaders that I'm aware of differ from Smith's position, prerfering the complementarian viewpoint.

James K. A. Smith writes:

My position on women in office (and marriage) is no secret to you (given our Sunday school discussions about complementarian vs. egalitarian understandings of marriage).  What you might find surprising, or perhaps disconcerting, is that it was a Reformed hermeneutic that led me to that position.  The narrative dynamic of Creation-Fall-Redemption is the lens through which I think about these gender-related issues.  The C-F-R dynamic, you'll recall, begins with a good creation, is attentive to all the ways that the fall has cursed creation (both human and nonhuman), and understands God's redemption as the salvation of "all things" (Col. 1:20).  In other words, the effect of salvation is to roll back the effects of the curse (Gen. 3); so in the words of our Christian hymn, Christ's redemption reaches "far as the curse is found."  The curse isn't just personal; it isn't just about individual sin.  The curse of the fall affects all of creation (the serpent, the ground, fauna, our work); even our systems and institutions are accursed.  So the good news of redemption has to reach into those spheres as well.

I found this interesting.  The logic employed by Smith from within the Reformed tradition matches well with my own, though I am not Reformed.  The work of restoration that has been actualized by the cross of Christ and the unfolding of the work of "new creation", in my reading, extends to marriage and ministry, opening the way for egalitarianism.

What is your position on women in ministry?  How have you come to those conclusions?  Whatever your conviction, I think it is important that the biblical, historical, and theological evidence should be carefully weighted and considered.  All opinions are welcome here, though if you're in need of guidance on how to best state your conviction, visit my comment policy.

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