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    « Can Pastors Keep it Real and Lead Well? An Interview with Mandy Smith | Main | Living What We Know »
    Thursday
    Sep152016

    Teach Us to Pray

    I do not recall who taught me to pray.

    Somehow, some way, I learned. And I am learning.

    My family was a starting point. Church and Sunday school were secondary settings. Together, we prayed. Or, at least I listened. Through listening, I learned reliable words I could try for myself. I also learned there is a God who hears and who is actively engaged with this world, and there is nothing beyond the purview of that God’s care.

    In his essay “Teach Us to Care, and Not to Care,” Eugene Peterson writes:

    Teaching people to pray is teaching them to treat all the occasions of their lives as altars on which they receive his gifts. Teaching people to pray is teaching them that God is the one with whom they have to deal, not just ultimately, and not just generally, but now and in detail.

    Peterson also writes that teaching other people to pray is an expression of care and is “the most central thing,” claiming that access and intimacy with God is “our genius as Christians.” Most often, teaching opportunities emerge when there is need. When there is need, we care, and in caring we enter “a school of prayer.”

    During family gatherings we prayed for one another, for our neighbors, and our nation. We prayed that the will of God would be done. Hardship often led to an increase in letters received, as loved ones would write and offer advice and encouragement, but mostly prayer. Accomplishments and celebrations were given over to thanksgiving and gratitude. Needs were lifted up.

    The church would also pray, that we might know God more fully and completely, and be given the grace and strength needed for obedience and holiness and maturity. The church also taught the great prayers of Scripture. We would pray for the infirm and the dying, the poor and the anxious, who would often be no further away than the next pew. In praying, our hearts would become more attentive to God, and our eyes would be opened to the reality of our neighbor, whom we are called to love. God’s action--God’s response to prayer--often came through the body of Christ, the people called to care.

    In Luke 11:1, the disciples ask Jesus to teach them to pray. I am asking him still. As we practice what we have learned, we teach, not only in praying but through caring. Our needs are great, but as Christians we serve a God who is greater still. In praying we are taught not only how to speak to God but are given knowledge of the God to whom we are speaking. We are invited to address God “now and in detail,” whatever the circumstances, and to trust in his eternal care.

    Prayer is God’s great gift to us, indispensable for spiritual growth and maturity, and absolutely necessary for the practice of sustained care. But it must be taught, and learned.

    Lord, teach us to pray.

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