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    Entries in Elisha (1)

    Sunday
    Jul102016

    Throwing Your Cloak

    In 1 Kings 19 we find the story of Elijah the Prophet placing his mantle, or cloak, upon the shoulders of Elisha son of Shaphat. We examined this narrative today in worship.

    In the Bible, prophets often donned a particular kind of garb. Imagine the ancient Israelite equivalent of the high school lunch room. You might find warriors, farmers, scribes, all congregating with those of like station. They are all within dress code. And then there is the Prophet table. Shirts of camel hair, rope belts. One or two are engaged in performance art. "Word of the Lord," is one oft-heard phrase. Prophets are found either compelling, repulsive, or contemptible. Few outsiders try to infiltrate their circle. Some draw a crowd, others are dismissed. More than one were killed because of their message. It isn't widely considered a promising career track, much like ministry today.

    In his day, Elijah the Tishbite of Tishbe in Gilead (a great designation) was the most notable among the prophets. As 1 Kings 19 opens, Elijah has experienced what might be considered the pinnacle of his prophetic career. At God's command, Elijah challenged the prophets of Baal and God prevailed. But Jezebel, the Queen of Israel, issued a death warrant for Elijah. Elijah fled to Mount Horeb, where God met his needs, reassured him that God had preserved for himself a faithful people in Israel, and gave him a task. He sent him forth to anoint a successor, both for King Ahab of Israel, but also for himself.

    When Elisha son of Shaphat appears on the scene he is plowing a field. Elijah approaches and throws his cloak over him. Elijah doesn't stop. He is on the move. But Elisha leaves his oxen behind and runs after Elijah. Elisha knows that from this moment forth, everything would change. The cloak signals a transference, a weight of responsibility, a trust, and a new start. The mantle of Elijah would be passed to Elisha. Elijah's way of being with God would become Elisha's. Elisha becomes a student, and Elijah is the teacher. But it is the Lord who leads them both.

    Elijah brought a word from God. Elisha was ready to hear it. The first attribute of the student, if they are to excel, is that they must be teachable. And in what might be considered both a "burn the boats" kind of moment as well as a profound expression of praise, Elisha slaughters his oxen, makes a bonfire with his plowing equipment, celebrates a feast with his friends, and sets out to become the servant of Elijah.

    One of the topics visited most often in conversations with my dad is every Christian's responsibility to serve as a witness to Jesus, to share the gospel and to live according to the mandate given in Matthew 28:18-20: "All authority in heaven and on earth has been given to me. Go therefore and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, and teaching them to obey everything I have commanded you. And lo, I am with you always, until the very end of the age."

    Elijah had been given a specific instruction: to seek Elisha son of Shaphat and anoint him as a successor.

    Like the first disciples, we too have been given a specific instruction: to announce the good news that in Jesus salvation has come, God reigns, and kingdom-schooling can commence. In this task, we are never alone. It is God who works in and through us.

    The call to make disciples is, in a sense, a call to throw your cloak, to pass the mantle, to raise up another, to invite others to join you on the way of following Jesus. And it isn't a call to one person here or there, but to all people everywhere.

    Throw your cloak.